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Gem Library

Morganite

BUYER’S OVERVIEW:
Morganite is a member of the Beryl family and is considered to be a semi-precious gemstone. While the availability of Morganite is limited and good color stones are rare, good size stones are available. Morganite is found in a narrow range of naturally occurring colors from light reddish orange (peach) through pink to light purplish red. The most highly sought after colors of Morganite are strong pink followed by peach (sometimes called Imperial Morganite or Champaign Morganite).

COLOR:
Light reddish orange (peach) through pink to light purplish red.

APPEARANCE:
Transparent to opaque. Morganite is a Type I gemstone and is virtually inclusion free.

SIZE RANGE:
1 to 20 carats.

TYPICAL CUTTING STYLES:
Transparent: most cutting styles are available.
Translucent: cabochons

POSSIBLE ENHANCEMENTS & TREATMENTS:
Morganite is often heated to produce a strong pink color from lighter gems. This color is stable unless the gemstone is exposed to temperatures greater than 400°C.

HARDNESS:
7½ to 8 on the Mohs scale.

BEST USE OF THE GEMSTONE:
Morganite can be used in all types of jewelry.

CARE & CLEANING:
It is best to never expose colored gemstones to cleaning solvents or chemicals of any kind.
Common cleaning methods include:
Ultrasonic: risky
Steamer: risky
Warm soapy water: safe
Reaction to Chemicals: can be damaged by acids.
Reaction to Heat: heat may fracture the stone or cause the color to fade.
Stability to Light: some stones may fade after moderate exposure to sunlight or UV light.

INTERESTING FACTS ABOUT THIS GEMSTONE:
Morganite was discovered in the early 1900’s by George Fredrick Kunz, who was the chief gemologist at Tiffany & Co. and named in honor of the legendary financier, gem collector and Tiffany’s largest customer, J.P. Morgan.

Morganite is typically found in lithium-rich pegmatite veins, and is found with Tourmaline, Apatite, and Kunzite. Some Morganite crystals may contain Tourmaline inclusions. Morganite’s color can vary from light reddish orange (peach) through pink to light purplish red. Some scientists attribute Morganite’s color to traces of manganese, while other sources attribute the color to the element cesium.

You may have heard the name “pink emerald” at some point, please be aware that this is a false name and simply a marketing ploy to bring this gem into more public notice. The true and only name of the gem is Morganite.

The finest examples of Morganite have been found at the Corrego du Urucum mine in the federation of Minas Gerais, Brazil.
Significant secondary sources are located in Afghanistan and Madagascar. Some high-quality Morganite has been extracted from the Elizabeth R, Pala Chief, Oceanview, and Tourmaline Queen Miles in Pala, California (near San Diego).

DESIGNATION:
Morganite has a long history but no traditions associated with it.

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